Stone Art

After spending the last week or so melting in the heat and splashing in the sea, I’m finally getting back to creating another post. The humidity here lately has been really bad (between 75-95%), creating that sticky lingering dead heat that makes doing anything take 10x the effort (also makes you sweat buckets which is kind of gross). So, to escape the horrid stuffiness of indoors that is not unlike being stuck in a tropical rainforest, I’ve been going to the beach a lot lately. While at the beach I decided to take a few rocks home with me and give them a lick of paint, so for old times’ sake I’m going to turn this little activity into a step by step for rock painting. So, without further delay, I give to you:

 A Step by Step Guide to Rock Painting:

thumbnail_20190712_111422.jpgStep 1: Find some rocks/stones- Beach rocks tend to work well for painting because they absorb the paint well and it won’t rub off easily. Make sure you to give your rocks a good wash before painting them, because the salt water/dirt might cause the paint to go grainy (also hygiene and all that).

Step 2: Give your rocks a lick of white paint- This is a bit of an optional step and only really needs to be done on the side you’re going to paint. If you have pale rocks you could probably skip this step. I got my rocks from a beach that is known for its dark coloured rocks. So, I painted my rocks white because the colours would have been very dull and faint, if I haven’t. (Let the paint dry before moving on to step 4 or I’ll most likely create a horrible mess).thumbnail_20190712_115859.jpg

Step 3: Stare at your rocks and try to work out what you’re going to paint on them- A little tip here is to try to look at the rock’s shape or outline and think about what it looks like. If that fails think of the weirdest thing you can think of and paint it on the rock. If you’re still having trouble maybe try decorating your rocks.

Step 4: Paint your rocks- Rocks actually make a nice surface to paint on, so enjoy! For this I used acrylic paint because it has very vivid colour and is the easiest type of paint to work with (in my opinion).

thumbnail_20190712_205051.jpg

Don’t forget to make a mess as you paint!

Step 5: Step back and admire your work- Don’t forget to give yourself a good pat on the back and compliment a job well don’t.

Step 6: Create a little gallery for your rocks- A gallery just wouldn’t be complete without some labels.thumbnail_20190712_214201thumbnail_20190712_213941.jpg

thumbnail_20190713_100037thumbnail_20190713_100117Hope you enjoyed this post! I know part of the fun of painting rocks is to hide your painted stones somewhere in a public space for people to find, but I don’t think I’ll do that (might just decorate the windowsill with them). Anyway, I hope this post has inspired you to paint a few rocks yourself and…

As always, Thanks for reading!

Gerry, The Paint by Numbers Wolf

thumbnail_20171230_132733I was given a Paint by numbers as a bit of a joke Christmas present (might seem mean, but was hilarious). As I’m not one for wasting paint or a perfectly good canvas board, I decided to give this bad boy a bit paint (also it’s a wolf. Wolves are awesome). Unfortunately, painting by numbers took me a lot longer then I thought and kind of stole all the time I allocated to painting. So, I’ve no new paintings to show you guys this month. Since this little project took so long, I thought it might be fun to do a little mini review for it.

First things first, what comes in the box.

thumbnail_20171230_134017A very large palette of 20 paints and the world’s smallest brush. Some really nice colours in that palette (my favourites are 53-Autumn green and 76-Bright Lavender).

thumbnail_20171230_133210And of course, the canvas board (tis confusion by numbers). A little tip, its best to take a good clear photo of the canvas before starting, because there’s numbers everywhere and things may get confusing.

Now that’s out of the way, time for the good, the bad and the I wish I knew that before I started, of this product. I’ll start with the bad, to get it out of the way early.

The Bad:

  • There are at least 3 sections with no number, so you have to guess what colour they’re meant to be and hope for the best.
  • The brush was so tiny, that it made progress deathly slow. So slow in fact, that I had to abandon using the brush for the sky and uses one of my other brushes. It was also kind of hard to keep hold of and I dropped it a whole bunch of times (not good, when it has paint on it).
  • The way the picture is numbered can be confusing, at times. There’s parts with lots of numbers and arrows pointing everywhere. Meaning it can be very easy to lose track of which colour goes where.

thumbnail_20180113_142130The Good:

  • It’s a Glob Dam Is there really any need, to say more? (Wolves are beyond awesome)
  • There’s also just something very satisfying about filling in all those little sections, with its corresponding paint. It just gives you that relaxed feeling, where the world feels right and at peace. Kind of similar to, the first coffee of the day or a really good hug.
  • They really give you a decent amount of paint. I still have a lot of paint left over and I was piling it on.
  • The picture, itself is very beautiful and is nice enough to keep after you’ve finished painting (It also reminds me of Hige from Wolf’s Rain, which is definitely an added bonus).
  • And most importantly, painting by numbers was a lot of fun and really doesn’t take much skill. Anyone could do a good job of it. Even a fellow coordination impaired person like myself.

 The, I wish I knew that before I started:

  • How incredibly messy this would be. At one point, I was basically wearing the paint. It was on my face, in my hair, all over both hands and on my clothes, too. Luckily, I wear my brothers’ clothes while painting, so we’ll not worry about that (a joke, of course. I’m not that mean. I asked them for an old t-shirt for painting).
  • How fast the paint dries. It dries ridiculously quick (within minutes), so blending the sky to make it look more natural, was a lot of works. You really had to work fast and keep that brush wet.
  • Also, how long painting by numbers would take. It took me weeks to complete, but at least you really get your worth out of this product.

thumbnail_20180125_133844Overall, I’d definitely recommend giving paint by numbers a try, especially if you like to paint. Although it has its short comings, it’s really enjoyable and is very satisfying. So, you can easily over look its bad points and really have fun with this little project.

I know some might think painting by numbers, takes away the creativity of painting, but sometimes just painting is enjoyment enough. Sometimes just having a brush in your hand and something to paint, is enough to make you happy and bring you some peace of mind.